Carbon Dioxide

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Carbon Dioxide: It's What Plants Crave (pt 2)

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Submitted by Elsewhere on 2020-Dec-04 Fri 14:16

In Part 1 of this series we learned that, as autotrophs, plants crave carbon dioxide to feed themselves through photosynthesis. In general, the more CO2, the more photosynthesis, the faster and bigger plants will grow. Knowing this relationship, greenhouse growers and indoor farmers often enrich the plant environment with CO2 to maximize yields and increase product output. Crop productivity is even greater when elevated levels of CO2 are co-optimized with light intensity, air temperature, VPD, and fertilizer.

CO2 emissions per container visualized with HelloContainer

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Submitted by Elsewhere on 2020-Dec-02 Wed 13:26

The Dutch shipping industry causes more CO2 emissions than all of the cars in the country combined. One container ship emits about the same amount of CO2 a year as 28,000 cars. However, not all ships are the same, which is where HelloContainer comes into play. HelloContainer is an online booking system…

Conventional #agriculture uses a staggering 70% of our #water supply and produces 30% of our #CarbonEmissions

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Submitted by Elsewhere on 2020-Nov-23 Mon 15:20

Conventional #agriculture uses a staggering 70% of our #water supply and produces 30% of our #CarbonEmissions. #IndoorFarming uses 92% less #water and produces 67-92% less carbon. If we are to curb #climatechange before it’s too late, things need to change.

EverFresh® active controlled-atmosphere system now offers CO2 injection option

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Submitted by Elsewhere on 2020-Nov-20 Fri 08:38

Carrier Transicold’s EverFresh® active controlled-atmosphere system for refrigerated containers now offers a new carbon dioxide (CO2) injection option to better preserve low-respiring, high-value perishable cargo. Carrier Transicold is a part of Carrier Global Corporation, a leading global provider of…

📺 Carbon Dioxide: It's What Plants Crave (pt 1)

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Submitted by Elsewhere on 2020-Nov-13 Fri 18:57

Carbon dioxide is essential for plants to live and grow. Plants are autotrophs, meaning they can generate their own energy to live and grow by using the simple substances around them. People, on the other hand, are heterotrophs; we need to consume external sources of energy (food), like meat and vegetables.  The simple substance plants use to generate energy: Carbon Dioxide.During the photosynthesis process, plants use light energy to break apart the molecular bonds of the CO2 compound, shake it up with some H2O, and wahla! They’ve created hydrocarbons (CH-) and oxygen (O2). The hydrocarbons (aka sugars, carbohydrates) are used as the source of energy for metabolic processes, such as photosynthesis and evapotranspiration, and are the building blocks for cell growth and development. Oxygen is the waste byproduct of photosynthesis, and our symbiotic relationship with plants is rooted. When the environmental conditions are right – plentiful water, balance of nutrients, good weather, and lots of sunshine – plants will maximize stomatal opening in their leaves and gulp up as much CO2 as possible. The more CO2 under these optimal conditions, the more they’ll consume and photosynthesize, and the faster they will grow.

📄 Effects of Elevated CO2 on Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) Growth and Rhizosphere Soil Microbial Community Structure and Functionality

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Submitted by Elsewhere on 2020-Nov-11 Wed 09:00
500Foods shared this story from Agronomy.

Agronomy, Vol. 10, Pages 1752: Effects of Elevated CO2 on Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) Growth and Rhizosphere Soil Microbial Community Structure and Functionality

Agronomy doi: 10.3390/agronomy10111752

Authors: Hehua Wang Haoxin Fan Huaiying Yao

Although elevated CO2 (eCO2) in the atmosphere is one of the main factors influencing climate and ecosystem stability, less research on eCO2 in greenhouse soil systems has been conducted, despite their prevalence. In this article, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiling, 16S rRNA and Internally Transcribed Spacer (ITS) gene sequencing and high-throughput quantity polymerase chain reactions (HT-qPCRs) for 72 biogeochemical cycling-related genes were used to reveal the comprehensive responses of microbes to 23 days eCO2 fumigation in the soil of a tomato greenhouse. Our results indicated that eCO2 significantly increased microbial biomass (p < 0.05). The fungal community was more susceptible to eCO2 than the bacterial community; the fungal alpha diversity indices decreased significantly under eCO2 (p < 0.05) and the abundance of Ascomycota and its lower level taxa also increased significantly (p < 0.01). The absolute abundance of numerous C, N, P, S and methane cycling related genes increased significantly (p < 0.05) under eCO2. Furthermore, the microbial community structure and function were correlated with certain measured plant characteristics. Hence, the microbial ecosystem of the tomato greenhouse soil system was stimulated under eCO2. These results contribute to a greater understanding of how eCO2 in the atmosphere affects terrestrial ecosystem stability.

Extra choice of valve position in CO2 dosing unit shortens intake route for outdoor air

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Submitted by Elsewhere on 2020-Nov-06 Fri 11:03

Now that growers are no longer allowed to bring in air from the boiler house for CO2 dosing because of the risk of contamination, many systems need to be adapted to draw in air directly from outside. Depending on the intake and valve position, that can result in many inconvenient detours in the pipework.…

New technology extracting clean carbon dioxide a win-win for greenhouse growers and the environment

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Submitted by Elsewhere on 2020-Oct-12 Mon 12:26

Promising new technology using leftover forestry wood to extract clean carbon dioxide is expected to benefit commercial greenhouses growers and the environment. The Kiwi invention would help increase crop yield and reduce emissions at the same time. New Zealand Gourmet's Roelf Schreuder said the produce…

CO2 GRO Inc. announces commercial feasibility at Iowa strawberry greenhouse

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Submitted by Elsewhere on 2020-Sep-18 Fri 12:25

Toronto based CO2 GRO Inc. is pleased to announce that it will install a Commercial Feasibility CO2 Delivery Solutions VCO2 system in a portion of Iowa based DeJong Greenhouse’s 11,600 square foot strawberry cultivation greenhouse. In February 2017, Minnesota based Dan & Jerry’s Greenhouses, one of the…